Monday, November 12, 2007

Strike update

Week two of the television writers strike and things are looking grim.

Layoffs spread. Lawsuits swirl. The Dark Rider approaches.

It's the end of days people. I tell ya.

Actually, I'm on board with Eli's earlier comment - the strike should be a good opportunity to catch up on my Netflix list. Plus, if there's nothing on in primetime, I won't feel guilty for spending eight hours watching football on Saturday. And Sunday.

Of course, as a TV writer and a TV fan, this is going to suck. Shows I like are going to go down in flames, never to see another airdate regardless of the strike's outcome. Some horrible reality show the networks throw together in the elevator will become a huge hit and a pop culture phenomenon with a spew-inducing catchphrase. If it goes on long enough, next fall's development slate will be completely ruined. Most viewers probably won't notice, more's the pity.

A complaint: One thing I've heard a lot is that there's nothing good on anyway and the writer's should be paid as soon as they come up with something that's not crap. Look folks, it's not the writers' fault that there's a lot of crap on TV. Heck, it's not really the network executives' fault. Networks throw a bunch of crap against a wall, and copy the hell out of anything that sticks. You want better TV, watch good shows and fill out your Nielsen diaries. And be sure to let me know once you've gotten everyone to agree to your definition of "good."

5 Comments:

At 1:08 PM, November 12, 2007, Blogger Eli the Mad (Beer) Man said...

> It's the end of days people.

I was wondering where you had vanished to!

> I won't feel guilty for spending
> eight hours watching football on
> Saturday. And Sunday.


Hahaha! I do that already! Fortunately I have a wife who's as fanatical about football as I am! ;)

> this is going to suck. Shows I
> like are going to go down in
> flames, never to see another
> airdate regardless of the
> strike's outcome.


Ya, I take back what I said about not missing TV due to the strike. We have our fave shows that we absolutely will miss (Pushing Daises - did you see the article on AOL where they listed it as the #1 show you should be watching?).

Speaking of... what's the status of Jericho, and shows that weren't due back until next year (Lost, 24, Battlestar Galactica).

> If it goes on long enough, next
> fall's development slate will be
> completely ruined.


Best guess... how long you think this is going to last?

> You want better TV, watch good
> shows and fill out your Nielsen
> diaries.


OK, how does one go about getting a Nielsen box and or diary? I've never ever met anyone or known of anyone who who knew anyone who has/had one of these.

 
At 1:21 PM, November 12, 2007, Blogger AndyW said...

The only thing my wife knows about football is to shout "Bret Favre rules!" whenver I give her the sign."

Theoretically, like 1,000 households every quarter in the Colorado Springs-Pueblo DMA get Nielsen diaries. So like 1 in 400 people should be getting one.

Honestly, the diaries don't matter much except to the local stations. Nielsen does tabulate them and makes sure that their metered samples are generating statistically significant ratings for the whole country, but nothing anyone in Colorado Springs watches or doesn't watch has much effect on a show's fate.

Sucks to be us!

As to how long this is going to last, I think we'll have a better idea in another couple of weeks. The networks are getting pressure from a lot of powerful showrunners, while the working stiffs in Hollywood are pressuring the writers. Ultimately, it's likely to come down to whether the ratings tank as soon as the scripts run out. My guess? Another three months.

 
At 4:07 PM, November 12, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Could studios transfer production to Canada?

 
At 6:34 PM, November 12, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

****Theoretically, like 1,000 households every quarter in the Colorado Springs-Pueblo DMA get Nielsen diaries. So like 1 in 400 people should be getting one.****

But you never answered, how does someone get one?

 
At 7:13 AM, November 13, 2007, Blogger AndyW said...

It's random - they ask you. If you volunteered, it wouldn't be statistically valid.

As for Canadian writers, I believe they're under the same contract, or at least the ones that write for American shows. There was a rumor floating around about using English TV writers. That could be pretty funny.

 

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